Lunch ‘Break’ or ‘Brake’ (Correct Uses W/ Examples)

Confused about whether to use “break” and “brake” when talking about lunch?

Are you generally confused about when or how to use both spellings as the words sound the same?

Here’s everything you need to know!

‘Break’

Definition:

“Break” is a noun or a verb. As a noun, it refers to a period of rest or interruption in activity. As a verb, it means to separate into pieces, interrupt, or pause.

Example Sentences:

  • She decided to take a lunch break to recharge.
  • Be careful not to break the glass.
  • They took a break from studying to relax.

‘Brake’

Definition:

“Brake” is a noun or a verb. As a noun, it refers to a device for slowing or stopping a vehicle. As a verb, it means to use such a device to slow or stop.

Example Sentences:

  • He pressed the brake to stop the car.
  • The bicycle’s brake needs to be fixed.
  • She had to brake suddenly to avoid hitting the deer.

Understanding the Difference Between ‘Break’ and ‘Brake’

Despite their clear definitions, “break” and “brake” are often used incorrectly. Here are examples of common misuses and corrections:

Incorrect:

He took a lunch brake to relax.

Correction: He took a lunch break to relax.

Explanation: “Break” is the correct word because it refers to a period of rest.

Incorrect:

The car’s break failed on the steep hill.

Correction: The car’s brake failed on the steep hill.

Explanation: “Brake” is the correct word because it refers to the device used to stop the vehicle.

Incorrect:

She had to break hard to avoid the accident.

Correction: She had to brake hard to avoid the accident.

Explanation: “Brake” is the correct word because it refers to the action of using the device to slow down or stop.

Related Here is a look at Homophones of ‘Waist‘ and ‘Weather‘ with examples!

Mnemonic Tips for Remembering the Difference Between “Break” and “Brake”

Using mnemonics can help you remember the distinct meanings and uses of “break” and “brake.”

Break

Mnemonic: Think “Rest”

Associate “break” with the concept of rest or interruption. This connection helps you remember that “break” refers to taking a pause or causing something to separate.

Example: “Take a break to rest.”

Visual Mnemonic: Picture someone sitting down to rest. Linking “break” to this image reinforces its meaning as a period of rest or an interruption.

Brake

Mnemonic: Think “Stop”

“Brake” relates to stopping a vehicle. This association helps you remember that “brake” is used in the context of slowing down or stopping.

Example: “Press the brake to stop.”

Visual Mnemonic: Imagine a foot pressing a brake pedal in a car. Connecting “brake” with this image reinforces its correct usage in stopping vehicles.

Combined Mnemonic – Break vs. Brake:

“Take a break to rest, use the brake to stop.”

This mnemonic helps you remember that “break” pertains to a period of rest or interruption, while “brake” refers to the device or action used to stop a vehicle.

By using these mnemonics, you can easily distinguish between “break” and “brake,” ensuring accurate and confident usage in your writing and speech.

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